You’ve scouted out the location for your garden… Figured out how much sunlight your space gets… And have decided what you are going to grow. Now it’s time to finally get your seeds started and aren’t sure what to use. That’s why, I wanted to share 5 items that you can start your seeds in. Strawberry containers. If you are growing...

You’ve started your seeds (3 sources to buy your vegetable seeds), and didn’t label them… …there’s no need to because you know you’ll remember. Wrong. We all tell ourselves that and sure enough we always forget what we planted and when we started them. Label your seedlings. You think you are going to remember what you planted where, but you won’t. — Tweet This That’s why this is one of my basic seed starting tips for beginners. On the labels you can write as little or as much information...

Today I am going to share basic indoor seed starting tips… …along with common mistakes and how to avoid them. It will be a good starting point if it’s your first time, and reminder for those of you who have done this before. The main reason that you are going to want to start your seeds indoors is so that you can get a jumpstart on the season and to the harvest quicker. I’ll say that again – Start your seeds indoors, so you can get to the harvest quicker. — Tweet This 4 Basic Tips for Starting Your...

You are growing your own food because it’s best for your health and the environment. When you are first starting out, knowing where to buy your seeds from can be intimidating. It’s difficult to tell the difference between the companies, types of seeds and who is owned by which company. My goal is to not only help you maximize your space when growing, but...

GMOs are feeding the world… GMOs are destroying our health and environment. With all of the conflicting information out there about GMOs, it’s hard to understand. That’s why I am going to break down the basics of GMOs for you and tell you why you should care. What are GMOs? GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organism and is most often referred to when it comes to our food. The DNA from other plants, viruses, animals and bacteria are injected into the cells of existing species. This is supposed to make them more resistant...

How can that title not grab your attention? Grotesque? Foul? Maybe, but it’s also possible to compost your dog’s poop. I came across the post on Rainbow Worms’ blog. Here is an excerpt: I thought I would share some Photos of my Doggie Poo Compost. I have two dogs which have no concept of moderation. LOL. I use recycled wine barrels each barrel is in a different stage of composting. I don’t use this compost on my vegetable Garden, but rather in my flower beds , and Lawn. I mix shredded Paper with the doggie Poo....

You know what you can compost… …But you don’t know where to store it before you compost it. It’s too much of a hassle to bring it to your compost bin each time. I hear you on that. This is why it’s important to have a kitchen compost pail readily accessible. 6 Features Your Kitchen Compost Pail Should Have A lid that fits tightly. Enough space to fit your food scraps. Style – which is debatable. Easily washable. Easily transportable. Preferably with a handle. Fits on your kitchen counter...

Can I add meat to my compost pile? Is stale bread OK to compost? Or, more importantly, what can you compost? The answer to that is in your home… …and to help you get started with indoor composting, I am going to share things that you have in your home that you can compost. What You Can Compost at Home This is by no means an exhaustive list of every single thing that you can compost. It’s a practical list of things that you all have. Let’s go through some quick composting fundamentals first. Compost is made up of...

Michelle Moore Not all light is the same. Plants respond differently to different colors of light. Light on either end of the spectrum, blue light or red light, have the greatest impact on photosynthesis. Kinds of Light Blue light, referred to as cool light, encourages compact bushy growth. Red light, on the opposite end of the spectrum, triggers a hormone response...

Today I am going to show you the easiest way that you can start to grow your own food. And you won’t need any outdoor space… You just need a spot on your kitchen counter. I am going to share with you how to grow your own sprouts indoors. No need to buy fancy gadgets or machines. You can do this on the cheap. You ready? Let’s do it! What you’ll need to grow your sprouts Mason jar Cheescloth or another breathable cloth I used organic alfalfa seeds from SeedsNow.com (you can also do this with any other sprouting...

Do you have problems watering your seeds? Not sure the best way to water them? I’ve had this problem too. That’s why I am happy that I came across this DIY project on FunInTheMaking.net that I can share with you. It’s DIY seed watering pot and it will help you to easily water your seeds without having the impact of the water harming them. What you’ll need Plastic jug of some kind – I used a milk container, but you can use a maple syrup container or something similar. Drill and a 1/16″ drill bit or...

Mint is a commonly grown herb in container gardens… …but do you know the health benefits of this herb? Well today, I’ll share some with you some ways that I use it and other ways that it can be used. Common uses for mint Soothes aches, pains and stomach problems You can easily make mint tea by steeping mint leaves in hot water for a few minutes. This has been known to help with: Digestion Hiccups Farting Menstrual cramps Constricted muscles Other minor aches and pains Antiseptic and antibacterial “Mint possesses...

Which herbs should you start from seeds? You can experiment and find out on your own… …or you can read the rest of this post and save yourself the hassle. If you want to save time and energy, continue reading. Some herbs require too much of your time There definitely is something fun about starting from seed. You get to take care of the seedling and watch it grow until you finally use. Like a child of yours. No doubt on that. But there are some herbs that are too much work and require too much of your precious time to start...

Deciding what to grow is an important decision. It’s also the question that I get asked most often when people are starting their urban gardens. To that question, I often respond with a series of questions that you need to ask yourself. Here they are: What’s the location that I am growing in? How much sunlight does my space get? What am I growing in? Once you answer those three questions, your choices will automatically be narrowed down. If you only get three hours of sunlight, your chances of growing cucumbers are small. Then...

What can I grow? That’s the most common question that I get asked. First, you’ll have to decide on the location of your urban garden. Then you’ll have to determine how much sunlight your garden space gets. There are four main categories of sunlight: Full sun. 6+ hours of direct sunlight. Partial sun. 4-5 hours of direct sunlight. Partial shade. 2-4 hours of direct sunlight. Shade Less than 1 hour of direct sunlight. Since we are living in urban environments, we have other structures that we are dealing...

When you live in an apartment your space is limited. That’s especially true when it comes to your garden. We barely have room for furniture. Forget about tomatoes. This is why it’s important to consider all options when deciding where to start your apartment vegetable garden. Since a lot of apartment dwellers are renters as well, we need to take into consideration the costs involved and what our landlord will allow. It ain’t no thang though because here are seven (7) spaces where you can start your apartment garden: Fire...

I’m going to be moving in the next couple of weeks. Why does it matter and what’s it have to do with urban gardening? Even though I’m moving into the apartment next door to mine, I am losing the balcony and the balcony garden. Why should you care? It matters because I will be growing in an all new location and using new methods including growing indoors using natural and grow lights and growing hydroponically. So be sure to hit me up with your indoor and hydroponic questions. Losing my balcony, but gaining more garden...

The strangest posts wind up causing some controversy. It doesn’t make sense to me. When I wrote about why having an emergency seed bank is important, I didn’t quite get the reaction that I’d expect. I received emails, Facebook comments and Tweets saying that I couldn’t be more wrong about storing the seeds and that freezing them was a horrible...

Winter is the time of year when many raising red worms will find it difficult. They find their worms are dying off. This can easily be avoided if you take precautions when raising your red worms. Seasonal changes affect the way one raises their red worms. When winter arrives we concentrate on keeping our red worms warm. It is much easier when raising red worms to keep a worm bin warm than trying to keep it cool enough during the warmer months. Raising red worms and transitioning from winter to spring can be relatively simple if you approach...

Some believe that one of the best investments to currently make is in an emergency seed bank. With everything that is going on with the global economy and food system, it’s hard to argue. What would happen if our food supply was cut-off? or the price of food sky rockets too high? Yes, it is important to have the canned goods and non-perishables, but what happens when they run out and the supermarket shelves are dry? That’s where having an emergency seed bank helps out. I’m not getting all sensationalistic and saying it’s...