Posted on Aug 2 2015 - 9:43am by UOG
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Looking to escape the rat race? Wanting to re-locate somewhere and start a full or part time homestead? This Urban Rustic Homestead/Farm is located in a desirable location in Bremerton, Washington.  Close to military bases, shopping, parks and plenty of recreation…not to mention the beautiful Puget Sound. Recently remodeled with new flooring, updated appliances,...

Post/content/images are from CivilEats.com – and – anderson.slhn.org Are Hospital Farms the Next Big Thing in Healthcare Reform? When it comes to improving the food on today’s hospital trays, some medical institutions are finding that onsite farms are the next logical step. By Jodi Helmer on July 21, 2015 This summer, St. Luke’s Hospital started...

This post/content/images are from www.SeedsNow.com How did you get started with your blog? How I got started with my blog, The Urban Lady Bug, was through Facebook originally, I posted pictures of our garden on my personal page almost everyday and had dozens of my friends and their friends, comment, tag and ask a bunch of questions. So I figured I should create a...

This post/content/images are from berkeleyside.com by Alix Wall/Bay Area Bites Whenever UC Berkeley student Sara Cate Jones has felt the blues coming on, she’s relied on the same remedy: she goes to the student garden on the corner of Walnut and Virginia streets and picks herself a bouquet of flowers. “The garden is always here for you,” said Kate Kaplan. Jones...

NationofChange.org is the original source of this post/images. Not only are people around the world capable of growing nutrient-dense, nourishing food that will feed their communities, even if they live in an urban setting, but they can also do it with élan. Some of the most creative urban gardening projects around the globe can inspire us to create our own green...

Posted on Jul 11 2015 - 8:32am by UOG
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Urban Organic Gardener Interviewing Rob from “Bits Out The Back”: How would you quickly describe yourself to others? I’m a stay at home dad that’s very interested in growing as much nutritionally dense food as I can to help improve our health and reduce our dependence on the industrialized food system. We live in SE Queensland Australia in a subtropical...

Become a Urban Organic Gardener! Here at UOG we believe that growing your own organic food can be one of the most rewarding things you can do for your mind, body, and soul. Become a member of the UOG Monthly Seed Club and receive a handpicked collection of seeds and garden goodies specifically catered to your exact growing requirements. Whether you’re growing in containers on your patio...

Source of this post is www.express.co.uk A RETIRED teacher who spent £5,000 of his life savings creating an urban garden paradise on wasteland has been ordered to destroy it. Jam Imani Rad, 65, installed statues, trellises and stone structures and dozens of plants to create the green outdoor haven outside his housing association flat for he and neighbours to enjoy. But...

Source of this content is deadline.com John Legend’s Get Lifted Film Co. is planting a documentary about four “gangster gardeners” who discover what happens when they get their hands dirty — in the soil of South L.A. Check out the trailer for Can You Dig This, which has its world premiere Thursday at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Fusion already has nabbed...

Source of this contest is from usnews.com by Corinne Ruff Nearly a decade ago, neighbors living near an abandoned elementary school in LeDroit Park in the District of Columbia described the area as a “thriving, open-air crack market.” But today, the once dangerous lot is flourishing with leafy greens, medicinal herbs and sour cherries. “Our community has...

This source of this post, content, and photos is from goodshomedesign.com The techniques you can use for making gardening far easier than it actually is are not that many and in most cases not that accessible in terms of costs or work put into getting it. In order to succeed, you have to think outside the box! The hydroponic system is that one clever way to grow...

How to Read Your Plant’s Yellow LeavesEven the most talented and educated gardeners will have to deal with yellowing leaves at some point or another. And that statement rings truer for those who maintain urban gardens and indoor plants since potted plants have a hard time getting the necessary nutrients they need for sustenance.That’s why Safer Brand put together...

This post, content, and images are originally from http://tgcva.org Obviously, coffee beans contain a lot of calcium, sugar, copper, magnesium, carbohydrates, and other vitamins inside. Some studies found the acid levels in the beans are very good for some plants that need acid, such as tomatoes, avocadoes, also various other fruit plants. Even the beautiful roses...

This interview is originally from SeedsNow.com (source: http://www.seedsnow.com/blogs/news/28929665-featured-homesteader-blogger-naturallyloriel-com) How would you quickly describe yourself to others? Mom. Wife. Dreamer of self-sufficiency. Lover of sweets. Knack for storytelling. Chicken & cat lady. =) How did you get started with your blog? I got started with my blog, NaturallyLoriel.com,...

At Urban Organic Gardener, we’re all about sharing inspiring stories of how people are growing food in small spaces.  A while back, we found Sow and Sow Gardens on instagram and have been following them ever since. What they’re doing is truly inspiring. How did you get started with your blog/Instagram page? “I got started with my personal Instagram page. I would post all kinds of...

Posted on May 18 2015 - 9:00pm by UOG
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This post originally was found on SeedsNow.com Vine tee-pees are a fun way to encourage children to spend more time in the garden. They will add a whimsical touch that even the adults will appreciate and are not only fun to look at but are extremely functional. Because they save space in the garden by using vertical gardening techniques, you’ll be able to grow more food in less space, and who...

5 Quick Growing Vegetables

Gardening isn’t usually a process that should be rushed. It takes time to prepare a spot that you’ll be planting in, and patience usually pays off when you’re growing your own food. There are a few crops, however, that always mature fairly quick.  If you’re short on time during your growing season or just want to get your toes wet as a first time gardener, we’ve put together a list of a few crops that are quick to grow and will have you harvesting your own homegrown veggies in no time at all.

 

1. Lettuce

shutterstock_107233463_1024x1024Learn how to grow your own organic Lettuce >

Lettuce – (Harvest in about 30 days) Lettuce is a wonderful crop to grow, and matures fairly quickly. Sow new lettuce seeds every 30 days for a continuous harvest that will provide you with fresh leafy greens year-round.  Lettuce prefers cooler temps, somewhere around 50-60 degrees but will also thrive during the summer if grown in the cool shade.  Have a sunny window? It grows wonderful indoors as well.  Short on space? Lettuce loves being grown in containers and usually doesn’t mind being crowded when planted so you can sow your seeds fairly close together as long as you’re not sowing varieties that produce a round head.

 

2. Radish

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Radishes – (Harvest in about 20-25 days) Want a fast growing crop that packs a ton of flavor?  Radishes take up very little gardening space, grow very quickly, and can come in over 200 varieties with a wide array of colors, shapes, sizes and flavors.   They grow well in containers, and prefer full sun however some varieties can be grown in partial shade.  In cooler climates they can be planted in both the spring and fall. In warmer climates they should be grown over winter.

 

3. Spinach

700xshutterstock_200666138_1024x1024Learn how to grow your own organic  Spinach >

Spinach – (Harvest in about 30-45 days) Baby spinach leaves can be harvested about a month after planting. The smaller leaves are loaded with flavor, regardless of the variety you choose.  Harvest the larger leaves at the base and allow the plant to continue growing and you’ll be able to harvest from a plant for quite a few weeks before it goes to seed.  It grows a lot like lettuce, so try and grow it in cooler temps. or in the shade during the summer.   Also grows well in containers and doesn’t require a lot of space in the garden.

 

4. Bush Beans

700xshutterstock_95261911_1024x1024Learn how to grow your own organic Beans >

Bush Beans– (Harvest in about 50 days) Beans love warmer temps. and seeds can be sown every two weeks during the summer to ensure a continuous harvest.  Bush beans usually produce most of their beans within a 2 week period.

 

5.  Peas

700xshutterstock_194277455_1024x1024Learn how to grow your own organic Peas >

Peas- (Harvest in about 60 days)  Peas are a wonderful cool season crop that take up virtually no space since they grow vertically on a trellis.   They do best when directly sowed. The simplest way to prolong harvest is to plant early, mid season, and late varieties at one time rather than sowing every 2 weeks.