How to Become a Gardener in 2016

Posted on Dec 31 2015 - 8:42am by UOG

“The new year is the perfect time to set new goals for yourself, especially if you have been thinking about growing a garden. THIS IS YOUR YEAR!  Don’t be discouraged by lack of space, or knowledge about growing specific varieties.   Set some small attainable goals for yourself in the gardening department and before the year is over you’ll be sporting that new green thumb you’ve always wanted but thought you’d never have.”-SeedsNow.com

  • Get some houseplants growing. Pick several varieties of herbs or maybe a pepper plant and place them in a sunny windowsill.  Get your green thumb without having to even go outside. By growing food indoors where you’re likely to pass the plant numerous times a day, it will make it easier to care for.  Windowsill gardens are a fun way to bring the outdoors in, and grow some food with very little effort.
  • Get some books.  Find some aspects of gardening that you’re interested in and begin digging a little deeper for the knowledge you’re looking to gain. Interested in hydroponics, aquaponics, herb gardening, or composting? There’s plenty gardening books per topic available. Grab your reading glasses and soak up all the information you can.
  • Take some classes.  One of the best sources you may find is your local Master Gardener Chapter in your area. You can take classes that will teach you the “in’s and out’s” of everything gardening and work with others who have like-minded goals.  Plus, gardening is always more fun when you have someone to share your successes with!
  • Join a community garden.  This is one of the best ways to be a part of a community and learn a lot about gardening.  Here you’ll see countless different approaches to growing many crops and you’ll be able to take those examples with you to try in your own plot at the garden.  Plus, it’s great exercise, tending to your garden plot throughout the year. You’re most likely to keep up with something if you’ve made a commitment on paper, like what you usually find with “renting” a community garden plot.” -Full article can be found at “SeedsNow.com