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Posted on May 18 2015 - 9:00pm by UOG
#0

This post originally was found on SeedsNow.com Vine tee-pees are a fun way to encourage children to spend more time in the garden. They will add a whimsical touch that even the adults will appreciate and are not only fun to look at but are extremely functional. Because they save space in the garden by using vertical gardening techniques, you’ll be able to grow more food in less space, and who...

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Most of us may have thought once or twice about throwing in the towel, walking up to our boss and calling it quits.

Maybe you’ve gotten to a point in your life where what’s important to you now isn’t what was important to you when you first started your career.

We all have moments in life when we need to re-evaluate what we’re doing with our time and energy. Sometimes you just need to overcome your fears and do what your gut is telling you to do.  The results just might surprise you.

Here’s a story about how one Seattle mom decided to close her business of over 10 years and started homesteading full time on their 1/2 acre urban farm.

This is her story about how she was able to not only make ends meet without the income she was missing, but how she actually started saving money & became self-sufficient.

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Julie from homereadyhome.com just published a great article highlighting important Container Gardening Tips (for Beginners).  Click here to view the original post: http://homereadyhome.com/5-container-gardening-tips-for-beginners/ Here’s a quick preview of what she has has to say about container gardening: 1. Don’t “grow” overboard.   “Container gardening requires a time commitment. You’ll need to be more hands-on (ie. watering and fertilizing) with plants in pots than plants in the ground. Your container garden will...

Source: NaturallyLoriel.com Naturally Loriel recently published a blog post on a very important topic:  How to Source Non-GMO Seeds. She says, “You begin to learn which food companies deserve your support and try to find a local farmer’s market in your area. You realize it’s so important to meet and shake the hands of the farmer that produces your food. Unfortunately though, you’re not...

StarTribune article and images from December 17 by Kim Palmer Season-extending structures are helping some Minnesota gardeners defy winter. Even in late November, Dawn Pape’s newest garden was a welcome sight for winter-weary eyes. In her Shoreview yard, under a blanket of snow, is a polycarbonate-topped, 2- by 8-foot box — or “cold frame.” Brush aside the show, lift the lid, and inside was...

Growing your own food is exciting, not only because you get to see things grow from nothing into ready-to-eat fruits and veggies, but you also don’t have to worry about the pesticides they might contain, and you definitely cut down on the miles they—and you—have to travel. If you’re up to the challenge—and it really isn’t much of one—growing your own food can be so rewarding. And so...

It’s obvious Ann Forsthoefel of “Aqua Annie” is excited by aquaponics, the growing of plants fed by nutrients from fish, which in turn provide a source of food when they reach maturity. “There are so few inputs compared to growing crops in the soil,” she said. With her gardens, she’s constantly building up the soil that is depleted at the end of each growing season. The beauty of aquaponics, she said, is that there isn’t that constant work because the fish are giving nutrients to the plants. Read her full post on Cooking Up a Story: http://cookingupastory.com/aquaponics

by Abby Quillen of CustomMade.com 1. Homegrown food is safer, more nutritious, and tastes better. When the latest salmonella or e-coli outbreak dominates the headlines, it’s comforting to know exactly where your food comes from and how it’s raised. And because vitamin content is depleted by light, temperature, and time, freshly picked produce grown near your house is more nutritious than conventional...

This homeowner observed his boring green lawn, and he started to ask himself, “so what’s the point?” Although it looked nice, it gave him no satisfaction. It was a lot of work to keep too. So he decided to try something else. Check out what he did next. Since the city was giving away compost for free, he got some and that’s what you see in the boxes. Support systems started coming up as...

Source: The More One Sows; The Greater The HarvestThis is the story of how and WHY I quit my full-time job, away from my home, to become a full-time homesteader. Can it be done? Of course it can.  And although I’m not advocating rushing off to put in your “two weeks notice” after reading this article, maybe it will give you something to think about for your future, where you want...

Not all light is the same by Michelle Moore Plants respond differently to different colors of light. Light on either end of the spectrum, blue light or red light, have the greatest impact on photosynthesis. Kind of Lights Blue light, referred to as cool light, encourages compact bushy growth. Red light, on the opposite end of the spectrum, triggers a hormone response which creates blooms. Orange and...

“Grow 40 plants in 4 Sq. Ft. Find out how to make an organic, sustainable, cheap, easy, and efficient grow tower. I built this for $6 and will grow 40 plants in 4 square feet. With the power of vermicomposting, this is a self fertilizing, and semi-self watering system. Great for patio gardeners or People tight on space.” MIgardener ...

Just came across this post over at jbbardot.com I think everyone should read.  You can read the full article here.  With the constant onslaught of GMOs, pesticides, and chemicals making their way into the food supply, growing food in your home garden has become less of a hobby and more of a necessity. Many people have now begun to grow a large portion of the fruits and vegetables they consume at...

Fall and winter gardens are possible, even when growing in containers. Stick with these cool-weather crops and planting suggestions for success. Get planting! First, we’re going to break it down by container size.  If you go to a local garden center you’re going to come across the same thing. 1-gallon, 2-gallon, 3-gallon, and 5-gallon containers are all great for growing food.  You’d...

Mint is a weed… …that means it grows like crazy and should be kept in a container. If you are growing mint, you likely have more that you know what to do with. You can easily harvest it to encourage more growth too. There are lots of posts out there that give you dozens of ways that you can use mint. How many of them can you actually use everyday though? How to use mint from your garden…everyday That’s...

Posted on Sep 12 2012 - 1:00am by Mike Lieberman
#6

Summer is gone and September is upon us. You think you missed your chance to start your garden and will start it next year… …That’s just a lame excuse though. You’ve made dozens of excuses why you can’t start. I’m sick of them and you should be too. It’s not too late to start your garden! That’s true for most of you in the United States. Yes, your options...

What is the simplest thing you can grow? Which vegetable is pretty much failproof? What is the one vegetable that is recommended for beginner’s to start with? These are questions that I often get and the answer is pretty simple. It’s not tomatoes I’ve been very vocal and shared why most of your garden’s will fail before. One of those reasons is that when you are first starting out, you want to grow tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and eggplant. These are all possible to grow, but they are more difficult when you are...

Seed starting. Who thought that it could be so intimidating… ..but there are lots of questions and things to take into consideration when starting your seeds. We’ve already covered some basic seed starting tips and tips for those of you starting indoors, but I want to make it even more simple and basic. Because that’s how I do. One-liners to help you start your seeds On the Urban Organic Gardener Facebook page, I’ve been sharing gardening tips. They’ve been pretty popular, mostly because I think they are...

Does it seem like squirrels are eating more from your garden than you are? Those long tailed furry rodents can be a huge pain in the…garden. Squirrels are smart and persistent creatures. If they want something, they will do what they can to get it. Squirrels on rooftop garden In this Q&A segment, Kevin from Philly is having squirrel problems and wants to know what he can do. He says, “I live in Philadelphia and have no green space…but I do have a roof deck and have spent the last few months getting it set up as...

She called her thumbs black. She said that the gardening gene skipped her generation. That’s what Megan Blevins was telling me on Twitter during the winter. We Tweeted back and forth about it and I assured her that her thumbs need not be green, but they just needed to be opposable. (Two things about that sentence. 1) I can’t believe that I wrote “We Tweeted…” 2) I can’t believe that you understand it.) That and some additional encouragement was what she needed to get her first garden prepared. Megan...