Behind the Walls of the Largest Indoor Farm in North America

Posted on Oct 28 2015 - 4:20am by UOG

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Behind the Walls of the Largest Indoor Farm in North AmericaFarmedHere is the largest indoor vertical farm in the United States, with 90,000 square foot space that all follow an eco-, city- and resource-friendly technique.

FarmedHere, located in Chicago, raises its plants with a technique called aquaponics. Plants grow without soil, directly in water kept nutrient-rich by fish. Using the technique, the farm yields both fishes and plants for harvest.


Vertical farming takes its name from growing plants on top of each other, often on tall racks indoors. These rooms are climate-controlled to conditions that maximize the growth and yield of crop. A major advantage of vertical farming is the sips of water it needs. FarmedHere, for example, uses just 3 percent of water traditional farming methods might use. Because the farms are enclosed, pesticides are unnecessary while the LED lights make sure there is enough “sunlight” all-year round.

Their website reads:

FarmedHere® produce is grown indoors in urban facilities, away from the bugs, diseases, pesticides, and weather that impact most produce today.

Our vertical growing technology and local distribution methods reduce energy use, travel time and costs tremendously, making this model one of the most sustainable ways to guarantee access to fresh, healthy produce in city centers, in any season.

Local farming also means fresher produce. Their products travel only a few miles compared to the thousand-mile journeys most agricultural products make.


Right now, FarmedHere raises certified organic basil, baby kale, baby cabbage and microgreens with up to 15 times as many crop cycles a year compared to traditional farming. Right now, FarmedHere is able to supply to around 80 retailers in Chicago.

PSFK has previously reported on vertical farming on the opposite side of the world. Most of which are in developed countries where abandoned tech megafactories are finding a new purpose in vertical farming. Another startup in Japan is planning to build a fully automated vertical farm.