Have the Hydroculture Seeds Sprouted?

Posted on Oct 11 2010 - 3:59am by Mike Lieberman

It’s been about a week or so since I started some seeds using hydroculture as an experiment.

Since I started them, I have to admit that I’ve been a bit negligent and haven’t been taking the best care of them. I’ve put them out on my balcony garden and have sprayed them down once in a while.

As of now, they haven’t sprouted yet at all. By this point, something should’ve have sprouted. I’m not saying that they don’t work and will keep the experiment going.

I’ll just need to take better care of them and make sure that they are kept moist. I’m also not sure, but they might do better indoors to start as well.

This is a way of growing that I definitely think could be useful for people with no growing space at all, so I’ll keep it going.

Any other ideas or recommendations?

  • http://www.anotherkindofdrew.com/ anotherkindofdrew

    I was first going to ask about light as I am not sure the balcony gets enough light. However, if I remember correctly hydroculture doesn’t need large amounts of light because it is more about the nutrients and micro-nutrients. Especially since you are growing basically void of soil anyway. I am going to predict that it will take just a bit longer for initial sprout but then will amaze you with growth and lushness from that point forward.

    My only other thought is air quality because you do live in LA and you do have the seeds outside.

    Thoughts?

  • Karla Lindquist

    When I’m trying to germinate seedlings, I find temperature and moisture to be my 2 biggest concerns. Since we already know you’re hit and miss on the moisture, that could be the entire problem…but, if they’re not being kept at a consistent warm temp that could also be a problem. You could fix this perhaps as easily as by placing saran wrap over the top or some other plastic dome type thingy.

    The 3rd issue could be as simple as it’s bad seed. What are you trying to germinate? Some seeds can take up to 3 weeks to bust thru, while others are there the next day.

    TIP: I have learned that EVERYTHING grows faster and this includes germination, when you use composted soil as opposed to that peat for starter plants. I have things going bonkers in my compost pile from excess seeds that got tossed in the compost heap.

  • Mike Lieberman

    I’ve started seeds on the balcony before and even indoors. I’m not sure what’s up. I’ve been keepin the moisture level up a bit more lately.

  • http://www.anotherkindofdrew.com/ anotherkindofdrew

    How could we measure it against a control group then? This is odd. I am wondering if they are receiving too much moisture. Has it rained outside on top of the retained moisture you have provided?

  • Mike Lieberman

    It was protected from the rain when it came down last week. Maybe it’s too dry outside?!?

  • Mike Lieberman

    Thanks for the tip. Will keep in mind.

  • Lica

    Nope, they should have sprouted by now. One thing that comes to mind is humidity. If the environment is dry the water evaporates to quickly and you just want be able to keep them moist enough. Another way to do it, is to stick the cubes on a saucer/ shallow tray and let them stand in an 1/2 inch of water and place a plastic bag over them. If you don’t want to use plastic a glass cake stand with cover should keep humidity in as well.

    Do you need more rockwool?

  • Mike Lieberman

    I think these should be fine. I’ll just bring them indoors and keep them covered like you said. Thanks.

  • seedman

    Your water must be free of chlorine (tap water), It must be kept in the dark till it sprouts, and the rockwool should have a PH of 5.5 before seeding.

  • seedman

    Keep it on a temperature controlled heat mat set for that plant and moist at ALL times. But not swimming. Under a dome is best to control environment and inside the house for a more stable environment