What To Do After Harvesting Your Vegetables

Posted on Nov 4 2009 - 5:30am by Mike Lieberman

Last month, I planted kale and lettuce in the container that I harvested my celery from. At the time, I wasn’t sure if the the kale and lettuces would grow because of the celery root.

Little did I realize that after being harvested, the celery would continue to grow. So now the containers have celery growing along with lettuce and kale.

I don’t think it’s the optimal growing situation because I already know that celery plants like to grow in their own containers.

Much like “Ebony and Ivory” they are living in perfect harmony. Ok, I wouldn’t say perfect, but they are living together.

So I learned another one of these lessons in gardening – after harvesting a plant from a container, don’t jam more plants into it. Let the original plant grow and produce some more.

It seems so obvious as I type it, but I’m so used to picking something off the produce shelf and it not growing back that I assume that’s what’s going to happen here too.

What your gardening story that you look back and say, “What was I thinking?”

  • http://obsessivegardener.blogspot.com/ Sylvana

    I've never tried to grow celery, but I know that lettuce is very accommodating. Kale? Not so much. It turns in a monster of a plant – but it takes well to being trimmed regularly and is easily transplantable when small.

  • Mike Lieberman

    Yes. I've learned that pretty quickly.

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  • lagreca

    I'm interested in growing a single celery plant for recipes that call for it. I was wondering if you could simply cut off a stalk or two at a time, like you would use a lettuce plant? Instead of harvesting the whole celery plant. Thanks.

  • Mike Lieberman

    Pretty sure that you can. Just start harvesting from the outside stalks.

  • lagreca

    Looks like you were correct:

    “You can if you desire remove a few stalks at a time rather than
    harvesting the whole plant. If doing this remove the outer stalks
    first and let the less developed inner stalks continue in their
    development. Take care not to damage the rest of the plant if removing
    individual stalks.”

    http://www.gardeningpatch.com/vegetable/growing

  • Mike Lieberman

    Cool. Cool. Lemme know how it turns out for you.

  • lagreca

    I'm interested in growing a single celery plant for recipes that call for it. I was wondering if you could simply cut off a stalk or two at a time, like you would use a lettuce plant? Instead of harvesting the whole celery plant. Thanks.

  • Mike Lieberman

    Pretty sure that you can. Just start harvesting from the outside stalks.

  • lagreca

    Looks like you were correct:

    “You can if you desire remove a few stalks at a time rather than
    harvesting the whole plant. If doing this remove the outer stalks
    first and let the less developed inner stalks continue in their
    development. Take care not to damage the rest of the plant if removing
    individual stalks.”

    http://www.gardeningpatch.com/vegetable/growing

  • Mike Lieberman

    Cool. Cool. Lemme know how it turns out for you.

  • Sales

    Wait.. You didn’t knew that celery keep growing even if you harvest all the leaves? Or did I get it wrong?

  • Msfirno

    I have started two stalks of celery growing after using them. I have since planted them with my tomatoes (it was a really big pot). I have also started my romaine lettuce that I used from the store. I just cut the leaves off the stock and put the bottom in a glass on the window sill for a week and it started to root. It is now in its own pot. They are growing nicely. I have also found that it helped them being organic. Some plants and veggies are sprayed with a root inhibitor.

  • http://www.UrbanOrganicGardener.com Mike Lieberman

    Nice. Keep up the great work.